The Regional is proud to partner with the following Purveyors:

 

Jodar Farms

5100 E County Road 48
Fort Collins, CO 80524

(970) 391-2825

 

Jodar Farms is a family-run farm located in Northern Colorado at the base of the picturesque Rocky Mountains. We are dedicated to producing wholesome, nutrient-rich foods. In order to produce such foods our animals are raised using all natural growing practices. We strongly believe that animals should experience the things in life that make us all happy… warm sunshine, green grass and cool breezes.

Along with producing healthy animals, we believe that people should know the whole truth about what they are eating. Complete records of where our animals come from, how they are raised and where they are processed are readily available. By keeping our members informed, we believe they will be able to make better decisions about the food they feed their families. -visit site

 

Isabelle Farm

10029 Isabelle Road
Lafayette, Colorado 80026

(303) 817-6824

 

Isabelle Farm is a family-run, Certified Organic farm owned by Jason and Natalie Condon. With the help of our stellar staff, we grow more than 80 varieties of produce on 110 acres in Boulder County. The owners dream became reality in 2004, and they have been growing produce organically on our land in East Boulder County since 2005. They’re located between Louisville and Longmont, about 5 miles from each, and 8 miles east of the Pearl Street Mall in Boulder.

Jason’s family has been farming in Boulder County since 1859. -visit site

 

Riverview Mill Farm

White Graves Road
Ranger, Georgia 30734

(678) 910-2831

 

Ranger, Georgia may be the farm’s mailing address, but it’s the banks of the Coosawattee River north of Ranger that Riverview Farms calls home. Nestled into a crook of the river, the farm has been our family’s stewardship since the 1970s; we started growing certified organic crops in 2000. Today, we operate our entire farm as a closed-loop, single-source entity, one that exceeds organic standards. We grow delicious produce, heritage breed pork, grass-fed beef, and grains that we gently grind into grits, cornmeal, and polenta.

Our farm isn’t small and it isn’t big. We fall in the middle, exactly where farming of the future will be. We use natural cycles to increase the fertility of our farm’s soil over time: cover cropping, crop diversity, composting, and rotational grazing through pasture and forest. The vitality of our soil is the bottom line for every farming decision.

Our animals happily roam in the fresh air of the pastures, forests, and swamps of their home, every day. All of our animals are bred, born, and raised on the farm, and we grow everything that they eat from feed crops, to pastures, forests, and non-sellable-but-delicious-to-them veggies. Yes, pigs love melons and tomatoes too! Thanks to their manure, our fields are fertilized with rich organic compost.

Living in harmony with the cycles of nature and the communities that we feed, the quality and flavor of our food tells the Riverview Farms story. One bite and you’ll know the difference that full-circle farming makes. -visit site

 

GrowHaus  

4751 York Street

Denver, Colorado 80216

(720) 515-4751

 

The GrowHaus is a nonprofit indoor farm, marketplace and educational center in Denver's Elyria-Swansea neighborhood.  Their vision is a world where all communities have the means to nourish themselves, and their mission is to create a community-driven, neighborhood-based food system by serving as a hub for food distribution, production, education, and economic development.

 -visit site

 

Mile High Fungi

Michael Nail

(720)481-0770

michael@milehighfungi.com

Liz Nail

(720)481-0769

liz@milehighfungi.com

 

Mile High Fungi LLC was established in 2014 by Michael and Liz Nail.  With backgrounds in sustainable agriculture and home construction, they decided to combine their skills and build a mushroom farm from the ground up.  Micheal's from Maryland and Liz is from Colorado, but they met at the Evergreen State College of Olympia, WA where they were first introduced to the fascinating world of mycology.  Since then, their interest in and understanding of the fungal kingdom has grown wildly.  -visit site

 

Living Land Farm LLC

4500 Robb Street
Wheat Ridge, Colorado 80033

303-653-5071

 

Living Land Farm is a sustainable, urban, family farm in Wheat Ridge, Colorado.

They offer fresh cut flowers & herbs, and nutrient dense vegetables to the community of local food and flower lovers in Denver area and the Front Range area.

Living Land Farm believes in taking care of the planet, Their customers and themselves. They grow everything without synthetic fertilizers, pesticides, fungicides or herbicides. They do not grow GMOs. They are constantly working to build the health of their soil, because that is where health begins.

  -visit site

 

Wianno

Widett Circle
2 Foodmart Road
Boston, MA 02118

(617) 269-6900

 

Wianno Oysters are sustainably farmed year-round in the pristine waters of Cape Cod. Through years of experience our growers have developed culture techniques that result in perfectly shaped, deep cupped oysters with an excellent meat to shell ratio.Sweet and briny in flavor, Aquanor WiAnno Oysters are cultivated from selected brood stock in the finest quality water conditions. Regularly monitored under state regulations, WiAnno Oysters play an important role in maintaining the ecological viability of the Cape's coastal environment.WiAnno Oysters are harvested, graded, cleaned and packed by hand to ensure consistency. The special attention given to each oyster guarantees Simply the Finest ® WiAnno Oyster every time! -visit site

 

Wellfleets

P.O. Box 1439

Wellfleet, MA

02667, United States

800 5 RAWBAR (800 572 9227)

 

Wellfleet oysters have been considered some of the world’s best for generations. The Wellfleet oyster is an eastern oyster, crassostrea virginica by species, the same kind of oyster that grows in Long Island Sound, as far south as the Chesapeake Bay, and up into Canada’s Maritime Provinces in the north. In the beginning of the 1800s, Wellfleet’s native oyster population was nearly depleted. Aquaculture, as we know it today, began as Wellfleetians imported young oysters from points south, flavored and fattened them in local estuaries, then harvested them for sale in the lucrative Boston market. Although people may not agree on which oysters are best, they do agree a real difference exists among oysters grown in different locations. Wellfleet oysters tend to be long and strong-shelled. Experienced tasters know that they are plump and clean with a distinctively good balance of creamy sweetness and brine. But what else makes Wellfleet oysters special? -visit site